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2014 Da Hong Xi Ying

Xizihao is a brand that I am quite obsessed with lately, and I am trying more and more of their teas from different years. This tea, the 2014 Da Hong Xi Yin or for short the 2014 DHXY is made from very high-end regions from the Mengla area. This tea was first produced to create a collection of supreme teas in memory of the ancient seal collections, by what I mean is the 1950s classic Pu Erh pieces ever made. Such as the 1950 Red Mark, Blue Mark, Yellow Mark, Green Mark and etc. Tony Chen decided to recreate these teas but using the best material he could obtain as well as making sure that the wrapping also is using exceptionally crafted paper.

A small sample of this cake. Long, bright leaves.

There were seven cakes that are part of this collection, which are the

2014 Da Hong Xi Yin                       2014 大红囍印

2014 Hong Yin Tie Bing                  2014 红印鐡餅

2014 Da Hong Xi Ying (Jia Ji)         2014 大红囍印 (甲级)

2014 Da Hong Xi Ying (Yi Ji)          2014 大红囍印 (乙级)

2014 Da Xi Lan Yin                        2014 大囍蓝印

2014 Da Xi Lu Yin                         2014 大囍绿印

2014 Da Xi Huang Yin ( Shu)       2014 大囍黄印 (熟)

5g in my gaiwan

This time I tried the 2014 DHXY in a 50 ml gaiwan, brewed with Whistler Spring Water with 5 g of leaf. I figured that this specific 1g to 10 ml is a great ratio to begin with, being not overpowering but will make sure that the tea shows it’s true colors and will affect my body sensation.

Basic info about this special tea:

  • 2014 Spring Tea.
  • From Government Protected Land within Walong 瓦龙, Bohetang 薄荷糖 , and Wangong 弯弓 Yunnan, China. Three area premium blend.
  • Hand picked and hand processed
  • Almost 4 CAD per gram
  • 200 – 600 year old tea trees

Temperature ( 95 degrees celsius)

Brewing Vessel (50 ml Jingdezhen gaiwan)

Grams of Leaves ( 5 grams)

Steeping Time ( less than 10 seconds per infusion, and every infusions increasing the time by 2 sec to 10 min depending on which infusion)

Dry leaves: Looks

Glossy leaves, golden buds and longish stems. Leaves are loosely compressed. Stone pressed.

Dry leaves: smell

Deep honey covered with storage notes of slightly old books added with this clean aroma of dried bed sheets. Clean clothes, fresh smell. A tiny bit smoky as well.

Wet leaves : Smell

Nothing harsh, very easy sweet smelling leaves with various ripened fruity aromas. No smokiness what-so-ever. Mango and passion fruit aromas from the wet leaves.

1st brew. Amazing color from the beginning.

1st to 3rd infusion: Lighter body, but very intense floral aromas as we expected, with notes of wild flowers and a bit of khaki peel. The throat feeling is super good, or what we call in Chinese 喉韵。However, the aftertaste starts to build after the second infusion. Not right from the beginning.

3rd infusion. Thicker and better.

4th to 6th infusion: Sweeter, a little bit of astringency which enhances the tea’s character. The aftertaste is really present throughout these two infusions. A little bit of a wild herbal taste coming out, but not overpowering.

5th brew. Very nice touch of acidity that is very enjoyable.

8th to 12th brews: Amazing brews, so buttery, so sweet.. It almost didn’t seem like a tea. It has such amazing, sweet florals combined with this mango, passion fruit taste which is slightly astringent, but quickly transforms into a deep honey pineapple sweetness that stays in the mouth for quite some time. I can tell that very premium material was selected for this tea. It’s just so easy and pleasant to drink.

7th brew.
Leaves expanding.
13th infusion. Getting lighter, but still very sweet.
The brewed leaves of this Da Hong Xi Ying.
Such beautiful leaves, I love this tea!!

13th to 18th brews: More buttery, still very fragrant and the tea was still strong and potent. When cooled, I get some faint mangostine and grape notes that remind of fruit juice mixes. Around the 18th brew, it has come to a conclusion that the tea was done and we couldn’t push the tea anymore.

In Conclusion

I like this tea, quite a lot. It has a very distinctive Yiwu vibe, as well as the leaf brews out so tenderly and not harshly. This tea is for sure a Gu Shu or 古树茶 that comes from very tall tea trees. There is barely any astringency, nor a strong bitterness. Very delicious tea. However, I would’ve liked it if the tea is a bit stronger, and can give a little more. I understand that the goal of it was supposed to resemble the tenderness of a Yiwu and more of a milder tea, but I would’ve liked it a bit stronger and a bit more potent. I would rate this tea at a 9 out of 10, just because of that part. Great tea, what so ever!

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