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Tie Guan Yin Oolong- Eco Cha

Tie Guan Yin Oolong from Eco-Cha Teas

Basic Info about this special Tea
From Pinglin and Muzha, Taiwan
Half Tieguanyin/half Jinxuan varietals. 
45 dollars/150g
500m/300m altitude. 
Brewing Parameters
Temperature (95 degrees celsius)
Brewing Vessel (Jingdezhen Gaiwan 90ml)
Grams of Leaves ( 6 grams)
Steeping Time ( less than 15 seconds per infusion, after the third infusion increasing by 10 seconds every infusion)
Main Info
Number of Total Steeps (6)
Aroma of Dry Leaves (charcoal, ripe plum)
Aroma of Wet Leaves ( coffee, cream, chocolate)
Taste Profile ( see paragraphs)
Texture Profile ( medium)
Feeling/ Aftertaste (huigan after first infusion, cherry aftertaste)
Attitude Rank: 7 out of 10.

 

Dry leaves before expanding. Both Tie Guan Yin and Jin Xuan cultivars!

 

Tea made from two cultivars intrigue me as it makes me wonder how the characteristics of the two cultivars affect each other and affect the final result. This tea, made from Tieguanyin and Jinxuan cultivars, should match very interestingly. I was excited to see how the milky aspect of the Jinxuan cultivar might affect the TGY. The results are expressed below.

1st infusion, starting light! But nice fragrance!

Initially strong, the tea when warm smelled like wild bushes, wood, and some dry mango. The TGY cultivar probably supported the flavors and fragrance of the tea, while the Jinxuan made sure that it’s smooth and well structured. The tea has a good amount of roasting on it, and because of the style of processing being the Muzha style, the tea has a lot of depth, strength as well as richness in the mouth. The fragrance is good, starting with a nutty, roasty fragrance and slowly changing into a dry to juicy mango. Robust, and reminds me of a Shui Xian Rock Oolong from the Wuyi Mountains. Although it doesn’t have the same rock yun or Yan Yun that I associate with Rock Teas, the characteristics of this tea is very similar; without the sweet savory turn I find in a lot of Yanchas. Boiled potato is another one, after the heavy, roasted note comes that warming, potato skin aroma that I get in a lot of Jin Xuan Oolongs.

Getting darker! 2nd infusion
The third brew

The second infusion was much more thicker, rounder, and sweeter. The best infusion, as it had everything from raisins to coffee to grains, to sweet huigan that lasted ten minutes or so. Good minerality, a little drying and nice strength. Gongdaobei smells sweet, like honey and chocolate. The lid of the gaiwan had that sourness that many Muzha TGY have, with intense veggie notes.

Third and fourth infusions in, the fragrance and aroma started to fade away, but maintains a very nice mouthfeel and huigan still persists. Nice caramel, honey, and a grainy sweetness that remains in your mouth. Very nice color as well.

The 4th brew. Super creamy, almost zero astringency.

Fifth and sixth infusions were definitely lighter, and by the sixth, I knew that the tea was done. There is just no flavor and thickness in the tea. Perhaps doing this tea western style might impact how the taste comes out differently. It might work better for this tea.

Intriguing colored leaves! Half and half;)

I think that this Tieguanyin Oolong made by Eco-Cha offers the sweetness, bite, and aftertaste that people look for in a nice dark roasted oolong. However, I expected the tea to last a little longer, and gave off a little bit more in infusions two, three, and four. It’s a good everyday type of tea, and can be enjoyed inside a larger cup or mug without worrying too much on how the taste changes on each infusion. Solid oolong for a good price!